Should we regulate artificial intelligence? Can we? From self-driving cars and high-speed trading to algorithmic decision-making, the way we live, work, and play is increasingly dependent on AI systems that operate with diminishing human intervention. These fast, autonomous, and opaque machines offer great benefits – and pose significant risks. This book examines how our laws are dealing with AI, as well as what additional rules and institutions are needed – including the role that AI might play in regulating itself. Drawing on diverse technologies and examples from around the world, the book offers lessons on how to manage risk, draw red lines, and preserve the legitimacy of public authority. Though the prospect of AI pushing beyond the limits of the law may seem remote, these measures are useful now – and will be essential if it ever does.
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Part I. Challenges: 1. Speed; 2. Autonomy; 3. Opacity; Part II. Tools: 4. Responsibility; 5. Personality; 6. Transparency; Part III. Possibilities: 7. New rules; 8. New Institutions; 9. Regulation by AI?; Conclusion: we, the robots?
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'Current debates and institutional initiatives on how the law should govern technological innovation, such as AI and robotics, should not overlook limits and constraints of such regulatory legal efforts. We, the Robots? provides an insightful analysis both ways – a reference book in the field of the law and AI.' Ugo Pagallo, University of Turin
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Explains how artificial intelligence is pushing the limits of the law and how we must respond.

Produktdetaljer

ISBN
9781316517680
Publisert
2021
Utgiver
Vendor
Cambridge University Press
Vekt
570 gr
Høyde
235 mm
Bredde
160 mm
Dybde
22 mm
Aldersnivå
G, 01
Språk
Product language
Engelsk
Format
Product format
Innbundet
Antall sider
310

Forfatter

Om bidragsyterne

Simon Chesterman is Dean and Provost's Chair Professor of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law and Senior Director of AI Governance at AI Singapore. His work has opened up new areas of research on public authority — including the rules and institutions of global governance, the changing functions of national security agencies, and the emerging role of artificial intelligence and big data.